Tisha Be’Av: Day of Calamity, Prayer for Redemption

By Allan Johnson

It’s time to do this. Time for all Gentile believers to join our hearts and hands with those of the people of Israel and of Jewish people throughout the world; joining with them in what they themselves have been doing for almost forever now – entering into a time of prayer on the 9th of Av for the deliverance that the Lord promised them in Zechariah 7-8:19 would one day come to them – that He would transform these times of mourning and fasting into times of joy and celebration.

Let’s join with them in praying for this. The date this year is Sunday, August 14.

You’ve probably never heard of these things. I hadn’t either. But it’s time for us to all get on board. If you click on Gidon Ariel’s Youtube video, you can get some good background info on the history of these things and some thoughts on how to join in praying.

So, why do I want to do this?

On a prayer walk through the woods sometime last fall, a realization struck me deeply and wouldn’t let me rest, until this opportunity to pray for Israel in a meaningful way had been opened up to me. A realization that I as a Gentile whose heart belongs to the Holy One of Israel, have a special responsibility to reach out in intercession for the people of Israel. Israel did not stumble so as to fall beyond recovery,” as Romans 11:11 tells us, but so that salvation would come to the Gentiles.”

That’s me! I’m a Gentile. And for this precious gift of salvation, I owe a great debt. To those who stumbled, so that I might live – I owe a great debt. My intercession for Israel is an expression of my deep gratitude for the precious gift that I’ve received.

Isaiah 62:1-2
For Zion’s sake I will not keep silent,
for Jerusalem’s sake I will not remain quiet,
till her righteousness shines out like the dawn,
her salvation like a blazing torch.

For some reflection on the current state of things in Israel – on things which by God’s intervention need to be corrected and changed – things which the Father wants us to bring before Him in earnest prayer – see Reviewing Isaiah 57-61 in the context of current events. Let the Lord speak to you through these Scriptures and their alignments with what we see happening in Israel, and through this, let Him direct your prayers. To print these things, you can download a pdf file here.

One morning three weeks ago as I was contemplating the significance of this day of Tisha B’Av, the following song grabbed me by the heart. Sing as if you were a son of Abraham standing in Israel, longing for the completion of the restoration which already is in process – and see the deep meaning that comes through. Let the Lord speak to you through these words. You can listen to the music at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoYdQa6Cprc. It’s beautiful –

Lord, let Your light, light of Your face shine on us
Lord, let Your light, light of Your face shine on us
That we may be saved
That we may have life
To find our way in the darkest night
Let Your light shine on us

Lord, let Your grace, grace from Your hand fall on us
Lord, let Your grace, grace from Your hand fall on us
That we may be saved
That we may have life
To find our way in the darkest night
Let Your grace fall on us

Lord, let Your love, love with no end come over us
Lord, let Your love, love with no end come over us
That we may be saved
That we may have life
To find our way in the darkest night
Let Your love come over us
Let Your light shine on us

1 thought on “An Invitation for Christians to Pray on Sunday August 14”

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    Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy.

    O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love; For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying that we are born again to eternal life. St. Francis Assisi

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